Five unusual travel rules you wouldn’t believe

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Some places have unusual travel rules that will really surprise you. Greece’s most visited monument is among them, according to wionews.com.

No high heels in Greece’s Acropolis: To protect the ancient monuments visitors are prevented from waring high heeled shoes at the Acropolis in Athens. This rule helps prevent damage to the site’s delicate marble floors.

No chewing gum in Singapore: Singapore has strict rules against bringing chewing gum into the country or spitting it out in public spaces. The law was introduced to maintain cleanliness in the city-state.

Photo: Anastasiya Lobanovskaya

No feeding pigeons in Venice: To combat the spread of disease and maintain cleanness, feeding Pigeons in Venice is strictly prohibited. Offenders can be fined for encouraging the bird population.

In Barcelona it is prohibited to wear a bikini, swimsuit or go shirtless or go shirtless outside the beach areas or you could be fined. This rules aims to promote respect in public spaces.

Picking stones from Canary Island beaches: Tourists visiting Lanzarote and Fuerteventura in the Canary islands must not take sand, stones and rocks from beaches. Doing so can result in hefty fines.

Source: wionews.com

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