Woman unknowingly helps man who minutes earlier killed her sister Tammara Macrokanis

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A woman who went looking for her missing sister unknowingly ended up helping the man who had just mowed down her sibling in a horrific hit and run collision, The Daily Telegraph reports.

Chenai Radnedge was searching for her sister Tammara Macrokanis, 32, on the Gold Coast on October 17, 2020 after the mother-of-five stormed out of a family gathering.

READ MORE: Man charged over crash that killed mother-of-five, Tammara Macrokanis.

Her search though was held up when she stopped to help a man lying on the ground next to his car on the shoulder of the M1 highway. 

Tammara was a mother-of-five.

Ms Radnedge at that point had no clue the man she was calling triple-zero for was Kaine Andrew Carter, who minutes earlier had fatally struck her sister while under the influence of drugs and dragged her body 60m down a highway.

When police got him off the ground, Ms Radnedge recognised him. She knew him through friends and asked if he had seen her sister – but her question received no reply.

She continued searching for Tammara until she returned home. It was hours later that the siblings’ mum, Penny Macrokanis, would wake her daughter up to the news that Ms Macrokanis had been killed in a traffic incident.

“[Carter’s ute] was still there, surrounded by police. It clicked. Kaine killed Tammara (and) I had been there not long after it happened,” Ms Radnedge told The Sunday Mail.

Kaine Andrew Carter, driver of car that killed Tammara Macrokanis.

Forensic investigators later determined Ms Macrokanis had became wedged between the bullbar of the ute and the roadside guardrail and been cut in half. 

Carter last month pleaded guilty to dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing death while adversely affected by an intoxicating substance and leaving the scene without obtaining help.

Reflecting on the scene a year later, Ms Radnedge said she regularly pulls over and stands at the tree where part of her sister’s remains were found.

“At first it was hard, I actually tried to avoid driving along the highway, and then I suppose I realised it’s something I have to live with now … I realised I had to stop jumping feet first into the life Tammara had gotten away from,” she said.

Source: The Daily Telegraph.

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